Author Topic: How to detect relationships between nested elements?  (Read 1896 times)

ea0316

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How to detect relationships between nested elements?
« on: May 19, 2016, 12:42:35 am »
How to detect relationships between nested elements?

Let’s say in a production environment there are several servers, some with an installed application server.

In a deployment diagram I would represent such a server by adding a device (may be with a server stereo-type) and a nested execution environment of type application server.

This is very easy to understand and saves space on the diagram.

Now I need to know which servers have an installed application server.

Is there any way to detect which element has nested elements inside or this that “nested” fact just an optical arrangement without any tracing value?

The picture https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Deployment_Diagram.PNG shows several nodes with nested execution environments.

Geert Bellekens

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Re: How to detect relationships between nested elements?
« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2016, 01:47:44 am »
It depends, you have to look at the project browser to be sure.

If the elements are really nested then they will be in the project browser as well. If not then it is only a visual arrangement that has no value in the model.

If indeed the project browser reflects the nesting then you could make an (SQL) search that shows the information you are after.

Geert

Paolo F Cantoni

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Re: How to detect relationships between nested elements?
« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2016, 09:44:53 am »
As I have said elsewhere, it is confusing (and incorrect) to call "visual embedding" : "nesting".  The semantics of the two mechanisms are quite different.

As Geert says, simple Visual Embedding has no meaning in the model - not because the interface couldn't understand that there is a relationship between the encompassing element and the encompassed element, but because it can't tell which of many possible relationships you intend.  This can be shown by having the relationship between the two elements (such as aggregation) before embedding and then visually embedding.  The EA interface sees what you've done and will hide the aggregation relationship.

If you want to visually embed elements you need to supply the relationships yourself.  EA can't read your mind here.

HTH,
Paolo
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philchudley

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Re: How to detect relationships between nested elements?
« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2016, 10:00:16 pm »
Here's a tip

If you use a Composition or Aggregation relationship between two elements to model a whole-part structure, then obviously you have a traceable relationship, but when you move the child inside its parent on a diagram, the relationship disappears.

Best of both worlds!

Cheers

Phil
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Paolo F Cantoni

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Re: How to detect relationships between nested elements?
« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2016, 09:32:33 am »
Here's a tip

If you use a Composition or Aggregation relationship between two elements to model a whole-part structure, then obviously you have a traceable relationship, but when you move the child inside its parent on a diagram, the relationship disappears.

Best of both worlds!

Cheers

Phil
Another tip is to NOT move the encompassed elements into the encompassing element, but to arrange the encompassed elements and then drag the encompassing over them and send tot he back.  That way EA leaves the encompassed elements where they were in the browser and doesn't (incorrectly) nest them in the browser.  Also, it means you can have multiple encompassments in various diagrams without EA continually moving the items around in the browser each time.

Paolo
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