Author Topic: Custom Search used with Model Document does not return the expected results  (Read 2502 times)

Darlene

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Created a custom search that displayed the element name for elements that have an Aggregation connector.  After run the custom search (My Searches), the expected results were displayed.  However, the search returned all records when generating a document for a Model Document using the defined search (tag = SearchName).

Geert Bellekens

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Darlene,

Posting the code of your query might help us to get an idea of the problem.
We are not clairvoyant, and my crystal ball just fell in the pond yesterday  ;) (stil waiting for the frog to dive it up)

Geert


Glassboy

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We are not clairvoyant, and my crystal ball just fell in the pond yesterday  ;) (stil waiting for the frog to dive it up)

Is the Dutch equivalent of the verb dive not directional?  (Dive is the going down, not the coming up :-} )

Geert Bellekens

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We are not clairvoyant, and my crystal ball just fell in the pond yesterday  ;) (stil waiting for the frog to dive it up)

Is the Dutch equivalent of the verb dive not directional?  (Dive is the going down, not the coming up :-} )
I think there are two meanings to the verb dive (in Dutch anyway, but I think in English as well):
- jump into the water head-down
- swim underwater, with or without scuba gear.

In this case I meant the latter :)

Geert

RoyC

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Diving is essentially going rapidly from one level to a lower level - Sky diving, dive bombing, high-diving, skin diving, diving valuations. SCUBA diving is a more gentle version, as you don't tend to descend rapidly (unless you are an experienced diver with special apparatus).  Whilst you can get away with diving through, I don't think you could say that you are diving up.

(Just filling in time while we wait to see if Darleen posts her code...).
« Last Edit: April 11, 2017, 09:58:11 am by RoyC »
Best Regards, Roy

Paolo F Cantoni

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Diving is essentially going rapidly from one level to a lower level - Skydiving, dive bombing, high-diving, skin diving, diving valuations. SCUBA diving is a more gentle version, as you don't tend to descend rapidly (unless you are an experienced diver with special apparatus).  Whilst you can get away with diving through, I don't think you could say that you are diving up.

(Just filling in time while we wait to see if Darleen posts her code...).
It is ALWAYS GOOD to examine the way language works...

Note how I fixed skydiving.  ;)

Paolo
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... Therefore, aim for consistency; in the expectation of achieving correctness....
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Glassboy

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I think there are two meanings to the verb dive (in Dutch anyway, but I think in English as well):
- jump into the water head-down
- swim underwater, with or without scuba gear.

The second case I think is one of those weird twentieth century language changes where a verb becomes a name for an activity, in this case "diving".  As far as I know people who partake in diving still use the terms ascend or surface for the coming up (not dying) bit.

A frog diving up has a quite delightful Alice in Wonderland feel to it :-)

Geert Bellekens

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I think there are two meanings to the verb dive (in Dutch anyway, but I think in English as well):
- jump into the water head-down
- swim underwater, with or without scuba gear.

The second case I think is one of those weird twentieth century language changes where a verb becomes a name for an activity, in this case "diving".  As far as I know people who partake in diving still use the terms ascend or surface for the coming up (not dying) bit.

A frog diving up has a quite delightful Alice in Wonderland feel to it :-)
Doesn't anyone know the fairy tale of the princess who lost her golden ball in the pond, and the frog who retrieves it? It's one of the classic Grimm Brothers fairy tales.
Anyway, if it's not "diving up", how would one describe the action the frog does to get the ball from the bottom of the pond?

Geert

Glassboy

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Doesn't anyone know the fairy tale of the princess who lost her golden ball in the pond, and the frog who retrieves it? It's one of the classic Grimm Brothers fairy tales.
Anyway, if it's not "diving up", how would one describe the action the frog does to get the ball from the bottom of the pond?

Odd you should mention it, I was talking about the Grimm brothers fairy tales last night with friends.  NZ is the end of a very long retail channel.  Traditionally in a lot of sectors like publishing, a container will leave Europe for the US, get picked over, go to Australia, get picked over, and then a much smaller container makes it to NZ.  So we tend to know of the tales, but may have only ever seen the Disney version.  Also the Frog prince is Shrek's father in law :-)  I do, however know how Maui captured the sun and fished up the North Island (Te Ika a Maui).

In terms of the frog, I'd have though the salient verb is "bring" not the mechanics of how it was brought from the bottom of the pool.  "The frog dove into the pool and brought the golden ball back to the princess."

RoyC

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Being of British extraction, I know a large number of the Grimms Fairy Tales and Hans Christian Andersen stories (and not forgetting Aesop and Kipling). We even have a large book of Grimms Fairy Tales in our bookshelf, but sadly my children need to see things on a screen these days before they know it exists. Also, Fairy Tales are in the news here in Australia at the moment, because certain education authorities want schools to either ban them or encourage discussions of their 'gender role stereotyping' amongst the pre-schoolers to whom they might be read. I wonder how that would go with 'The Three Little Pigs'?

Anyway, I agree with Glassboy in saying 'The Frog dived (not dove) into the pool and brought the golden ball back up to the Princess'. But if you want a mechanism, then 'swam back up with the Golden Ball'.  After a dive, you swim down, around, or back up. Unless things go badly wrong, in which case you either float back up or stay on the bottom...

Where IS that Darlene with her code?
Best Regards, Roy

Glassboy

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Anyway, I agree with Glassboy in saying 'The Frog dived (not dove) into the pool and brought the golden ball back up to the Princess'. But if you want a mechanism, then 'swam back up with the Golden Ball'.  After a dive, you swim down, around, or back up. Unless things go badly wrong, in which case you either float back up or stay on the bottom...

dived/dove are equivalent.  It's a case of the verb being treated (almost ahistorically) as a strong verb not a weak verb.

to dive I dive; you dive; he, she, it dives; we dive; you dive; they dive I dived/dove; you dived/dove; he, she, it dived/dove; we dived/dove; you dived/dove; they dived/dove dived/dove

:-)

RoyC

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I partially recant, and say that actually Glassboy probably did use the right word. After talking to myself for a while (as I often do... nothing strange about that, is there Roy?) I concluded that I would probably say "I dived off..." and "I dove (in)to...". As in "I dived off the bridge and dove to the bottom" (and then swam back up).  Which sounds quite weird.
Best Regards, Roy

Glassboy

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I partially recant, and say that actually Glassboy probably did use the right word. After talking to myself for a while (as I often do... nothing strange about that, is there Roy?) I concluded that I would probably say "I dived off..." and "I dove (in)to...". As in "I dived off the bridge and dove to the bottom" (and then swam back up).  Which sounds quite weird.

Nah it sounds normal for someone exposed to both UK and American English.  And Dive is close in sound to (the strong verb) Drive, so there's a sympathy with drive/drived/drove.

AndyJ

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...and here I am patiently waiting for someone to say:

"Bake the hall in the candle of her brain."
Sun Tzu: "If you sit by the river long enough, eventually the body of MS Visio floats past."

Glassboy

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...and here I am patiently waiting for someone to say:

"Bake the hall in the candle of her brain."

I think this is the only place where people's pop culture references make me feel young rather than too old.