Author Topic: class relation, diamond, but arrow.  (Read 2759 times)

Makulik

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Re: class relation, diamond, but arrow.
« Reply #30 on: February 18, 2010, 12:41:17 am »
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Hi GŁnther ,

if you could bring some code for example it would be easier for me to understand your point. But without deeper thinking if for generic does not work(i need example from you to state this) than it can show simplier uml diagram if no generic code is there than the correct uml diagram.

br
Milan.
I think that would lead a bit far to give an example here (just take a look at Wikipedia C++ CRTP).
Let's put it simple: Yes, for languages (like C# or Java) that support the 'interface' keyword it would be easy to extract these on reverse engineering. For other languages (e.g. C++) and concepts that don't implement an interface by means of abstract classes or s.th. alike, this might become hard, if not impossible.

WBR
GŁnther

allnamesaretaken

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Re: class relation, diamond, but arrow.
« Reply #31 on: February 18, 2010, 10:54:39 pm »
Hallo Simon,

yes I agree that compiler supprot should be part of EA. I am bit supprized that it is not prioretized.

Considering Modeling (the main purpose of EA) is it possible that connecting UML icons without code support make lot of practical sence ?
I would be thankfull if you could send me any example of purpose/application of EA in some middle size(or bigger) project?
it seems I have problem of expecting that UML have to produce something and not just to be used as painting tool.

br,
Milan.

Geert Bellekens

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Re: class relation, diamond, but arrow.
« Reply #32 on: February 18, 2010, 10:59:34 pm »
Milan,

There's a whole world of modelling out there that doesn't use code generations (or reverse engineering).
I think that a large percentage of big software projects use UML for the analysis, but no code generation.

Geert