Author Topic: BPMN Message attributes/paramaetesr  (Read 1922 times)

Gary W.

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BPMN Message attributes/paramaetesr
« on: April 15, 2014, 08:11:50 am »
Hi

I searched for 'bpmn', 'message', 'attributes' but found nothing on this.  How could I represent interaction between our business activities and services provided by external systems?

So if we need to lookup a Client from an external and shared  'Common Client' service, how do I show 'send clientID, dateValid' and expect 'clientName, clientType, contactName'?

This is at a requirements level, and so maybe it's too low-level for BPMN?  Some people here are simply putting in the the logical data model but it seems wierd to model structural attributes for a behavior that is partly external.

TIA
Gary 'knows lots about UML but little about BPMN' Wong

Jacob Vos

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Re: BPMN Message attributes/paramaetesr
« Reply #1 on: May 08, 2014, 01:03:59 am »
Hi Gary,

I think you go very detailed if you want to formally specify the attributes in BPMN (so in another format than text).

Maybe it's enough for you when the service is described at one place in your BPMN model. I was thinking about the following.

Let's say the 'Common Client' service comprises three steps: message start event, service task and message end event. Calling the service means two message flows with the process from which you want to use the service: one to the message start event (= request) and one from the message end event (= response).

To each message flow, a message can be linked. See the tag 'messageRef'. So you can have a 'request message' and a 'response message'. You could model them and describe the attributes there.

However: how to define this 'construct' of three steps only once? In fact it is a process, so you could model it as a (global) process, to be reused. However this would require that every time you want to invoke the service you have to define a Call Activity in the process from which you want to do the invocation. So still much modelling effort.

So I was thinking to model a reusable process called 'Use Common Client Service'. This would comprise an activity to call the service (not within a pool) and also the three steps mentioned above (in a pool) and the message flows as described above.

Then in the processes where you want to use the service, you define a Call Activity (tag 'isACalledActivity' (sic!) = true) that you let refer to the reusable process (tag 'calledActivityRef' = set to '<<Business Process>>Use Common Client Service').

Those are my thoughts, but I am open to alternatives.

- Jacob

Gary W.

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Re: BPMN Message attributes/paramaetesr
« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2014, 07:20:21 am »
Thanks Jacob.. I'll have to mull over what you suggest.. and in fact, try it out... thanks for the suggestion.
gary

AndyJ

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Re: BPMN Message attributes/paramaetesr
« Reply #3 on: July 02, 2014, 09:28:05 am »
In my case, this tends to be around about the level where I'll move from a BPMN business process to a UML Use Case.

If the content of a message is important on a BPMN diagram, I would just attach a note to the message flow.

However, you may be required to describe your business processes to a much higher level of detail than me...

 :)

Andy
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AndyJ

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Re: BPMN Message attributes/paramaetesr
« Reply #4 on: July 02, 2014, 09:30:33 am »
And... Just in case it is not obvious...

If I see an interaction between a person and a system on a
BPMN diagram this triggers me to think...

"Hmm... Do I need a Use Case to describe this interaction?"

Where the interactions are low enough to be a single step in a Use Case, I use this as evidence that I've drilled down too far in the BPMN diagrams.

Andy
Sun Tzu: "If you sit by the river long enough, eventually the body of MS Visio floats past."